Color Enhancement in Photoshop 7


 
Fig. 1

Ever take that perfect shot only to find that the resulting image is missing all the beautiful color you saw when taking the shot? It happens because of the differences in how our eyes see color as opposed to what the film (or CCD plate for digital cameras) can really see.

Figure 1 shows a bright yellow and black moth on a sunlit window. unexpectedly the moth came out all washed out and dark. The reasons? 1.The light background caused the camera's auto exposure setting to under expose the subject. 2. The auto exposure setting on this camera (Minolta Dimage) tries to compensate for daylight further washing out the blue in the glass background.

 

Open the image called moth1.jpg (download moth1.zip here). Create a copy of the background layer by dragging the layer too the new layer button on the bottom of the "Layers" pallet and click on the new layer to select it. Choose the "Magic Wand " selection tool (W) and set the tolerence to 125 . Click on the blue area away from the moth. You will see that everthing except the moth has been selected (fig. 2). From the menu select "Select" and then "Save Selection" change to "New" and name the selection as "Background"Next, press SHFT+CTRL+I to invert the selection. Save as before and call the selection "Moth"(fig. 3).

Please don't worry if your mask is not perfect, this process will not require a great deal of accuracy.

As the moth is currently selected we will work on it first. Select "Image" fromthe Menu bar, then "Adjustments" then "Hue and Saturation"(fig 4)

From the Master drop down select Yellow and adjust the slider to increase the yellow saturation to about +66, adjust Lightness to +5.Click OK. Invert the mask as before to select the blue area (or load from the selection menu). Click CTRL+U to open the Hue and Saturation pallet again. Now choose Cyan and adjust the saturation level to +25 and the Lightness to -7. Click OK and you are done. (fig.5)

Mike R.

    Fig. 2
    Fig. 3

 

Fig. 4
   Fig. 5




   
   
   



 
 
   
   
   
 
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